The Art of Delegation
Old-Fashioned Family Fun at the Beach

Family Reunions: Make Every Communiqué Count

Family reunions often require more than a single notice. Reunion planners commonly communicate with their families numerous times during the planning process. That’s a lotta family! Even before you reunite. Here’s how to make every communiqué count:

1. Include family in early decisions about date and location. By including more family members in the early, pivotal decisions of location and date, other details become secondary. Any decision you make about transportation, food, activities, etc. become part of the bigger decisions they helped select. It also builds interest and momentum. Plus, the bigger the consensus on location and date, the more people you’re likely to get by giving them a chance to plan their travel schedules well in advance. Points for you!

2. Send a "save the date" reminder. Once the key decisions of date, location and budget are made (via the first, exploratory communications), send out a "save the date" reminder email (made easy with TripHub.com's free planning tools) with the reunion dates, location and, if known, lodging info.

At this point, you can also ask people whether they plan to attend to get an estimated head count.

"Save the date" reminders are also great opportunities for enlisting volunteers to help with planning. See The Art of Delegation for ways to get the most out of your volunteers.

3. Lost in email translation. Spam, work and personal emails all create mounds of cyber-data that can be overwhelming. In group planning, I’ve found sending details out in bulk after key decisions have been made mitigates questions and headache for you, the organizer.

4. Written invitations. While email works well for many communications, a written invitation for a family reunion can do wonders - something colorful, eye-catching and postcard-sized that can easily be put on your fridge or bulletin board. This also helps for great-grandparents or others less likely to use email regularly (or at all).

What to include on your invitation:

  • Dates
  • Times of scheduled events or activities
  • Location (with full address or map)
  • Lodging options (including phone numbers and room block details)
  • Overall trip agenda (if confirmed) so attendees can plan their free time accordingly

5. Highlight volunteers. You might want to highlight volunteers who are helping to plan particular activities. This increases visibility to those helping, shows appreciation and stirs interest in the reunion by alerting the family of fun that will be had by all. This also gives you a way to steer communication to the volunteers in charge of them, freeing up your time to focus on other projects.

6. Get RSVPs back on time. Whether using the "save the date" or written invitation to get RSVPs, give your group a specific deadline. Provide both an email and phone number for people to RSVP. I also recommend picking one key contact per nuclear family to get their family’s RSVPs back on time. This simplifies things and leaves the burden of communication to a head of household or ultra-organized family member (anyone come to mind?).

How TripHub helps track RSVPs:

  • You can easily track response rates using TripHub, including regular reports on who has booked hotel rooms, who has RSVP’d and more.
  • Attendees can RSVP right on TripHub or call you and you (as group organizer) can alter their status.
  • If response rates are low, you may need to send out another email or follow up with people individually. TripHub allows you to filter and alert all or only those who haven’t yet responded. If they don’t respond by email, you might try calling.

7. Final family reunion reminder. Send a final reminder email several weeks before the reunion. This is your opportunity to communicate any updates or changes and to reconfirm key details. This email can also serve as a "last call" to those who have not yet confirmed their plans. Using TripHub.com free planning tools, everyone can see who else is coming. This will get people excited and give them a chance to schedule their own "side events" (i.e., golfing with Uncle Bill). Other helpful items to include are maps, destination information, important numbers (one cell phone number per nuclear family, etc.) and a "what to bring" list.

8. Post-reunion wrap-up. Finally, you can send a wrap-up letter/email to the whole family (everyone who was invited, not only those who attended) with your favorite stories, pictures from the reunion, and a family contact list. A family Web site is great for this as well.

Do you know of other ways to make communication efficient and easy? Share your thoughts by posting a comment.

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